UK Visas: Summary of New Changes to the Immigration Rules

The long-awaited Statement of Changes giving us more details on the famous new Points-Based Immigration System (UK Visas) has now been published.

Overview

  • Majority of changes take effect on 1 December 2020.
  • Most changes relating to provisions for Irish citizens, Appendix ECAA and Appendix FM take effect on 31 December 2020.
  • Changes relating to Hong Kong British Nationals (Overseas) take effect on 31 January 2021.

Refusal grounds

Major, and restrictive changes are made to the refusal grounds. Most changes, but not all, do not apply to applications under Appendix FM (Family Route), Appendix AF (Armed Forces), Appendix EU (EU Settlement Scheme), Appendix EU (Family Permit), Part 11 (Asylum) (except paragraph 352ZH, 352ZP, 352J and 352U), Appendix S2 Healthcare Visitor and Appendix Service Providers from Switzerland.

  • There are new discretionary grounds for refusal or cancellation for customs breaches, rough sleeping or being involved in a sham marriage. Rough sleeping is particularly nasty, considering that some end up rough sleeping as a direct result of Home Office hostile environment policies.
  • There is a mandatory ground of refusal for those who have been convicted and sentenced to 12 months or more imprisonment; those who are persistent offenders; and those who have caused serious harm, seemingly without time-limit. In the past, persistent offending and causing serious harm was a discretionary ground. In addition, those sentenced to 12 months or more imprisonment would have their applications refused for 10 years “only”.
  • Sentences of less than 12 months imprisonment, and non-custodial sentences and out-of-court disposals recorded on an applicant’s criminal records, will be fatal for a period of 12 months for visitors and others applying for entry for less than 6 months. For other applicants, those lesser sentences will be discretionary grounds for refusal.
  • On a more positive note, false representations are now discretionary, rather than mandatory, grounds for refusal, unless “the decision-maker can prove that it is more likely than not that the applicant used deception”

English language

For the majority of routes, the English language requirement is amended to:

  • allow applicants to only prove the required level of English once
  • introduce Malta as a “majority speaking English language country”
  • allow people with a degree from Ireland to rely on that as proof of English language
  • allow applicants to rely on GCSE/A Level or Scottish Highers in English while at school in the UK to prove English language. This last change will, initially, only apply to applications for students, skilled workers, start-up and innovator migrants

Finances

Note that some figures differ between the Statement of Changes and the Explanatory Memorandum – make sure you are reading the Statement of Changes!

Some positive changes to financial requirements include:

  • Students, Skills Workers, Intro-Company Workers, Tier 2 Minister of Religion, Tier 2 Sportpersons, Tier 5 (Temporary Workers), Start-up and Innovator applicants will not need to meet the maintenance requirement if they have been in the UK for more than 12 months.
  • Applicants can rely on electronic bank statements without needing to have the bank stamp every page (note that this does not apply to Appendix FM-SE applications)
  • Applicants will be able to rely on a wider range of accounts (not just cash or cash savings), so long as the funds can be accessed immediately
  • Most applicants will need to submit evidence ending within 31 days of the date of application

In terms of figures –

  • The maintenance requirement for Parents of a Child Student will be  set at £1,560/month up to a maximum of 9 months; and an additional £625/month for any child other than the Child Student who will be under their care in the UK
  • The maintenance requirement for Skilled Workers, Intra-Company Workers, Tier 2 Minister of Religion and Sportpersons, Innovators and Start-Ups, Tier 5 (Temporary Workers), including Seasonal Workers, Religious Workers,  Charity Workers, Creative and Sporting workers, International Agreement Workers and Government Authorised Exchange Workers will be increased from £945 to £1,270 and applicants are now required to show they have held the funds for 28 days
  • For most dependants, the maintenance requirement is reduced from £630 to £285 for a dependant partner, £315 for the first child applying and £200 for each subsequent child
  • The maintenance requirement for Youth Mobility Applicants will be increased from £1,890 to £2,530 and applicants are now required to show they have held the funds for 28 days

Continuous Residence

A new Appendix Continuous Residence is introduced, to apply to most routes (but not Appendix FM and Appendix EUSS, for example). Many requirements will be familiar, including that continuity of residence is broken by absences of more than 180 days in any one year. Interestingly, it specifically refers to absences due to a “pandemic” as an exception to the rule.

COVID-19 concessions

In recent months, the Home Office has often repeated that those who did not have leave in the UK due to the pandemic would not be treated as overstayers. This has now made it into the rules, by amending paragraph 39E to allow caseworkers to disregard overstaying between 24 January 2020 and 31 August 2020.

Visitors  – UK Visas

  • Visitors, who so far could only study for up to 30 days, will be allowed to study for up to six months. This also means that applicants who previously had to apply for a short-term student visa to study for a period of between 30 days and 6 months can now apply for a visit visa. There is still a short-term study route for those who want to study for a period of between 6 and 11 months. In addition, visitors who want to study recreational courses are still limited to 30 days.
  • Volunteering no longer need to be “incidental to the main reason for the visit”, although it should be limited to 30 days.
  • Academic visitors will have more liberty to apply to extend their permission to stay in the UK for up to 12 months.

Students – UK Visas

Students already had their “big moment” in the last Statement of Changes, which we discussed in this post. However, one additional change brought by these rules is the maintenance level, which will now be £1,334/month for students inside London and £1,023 for students outside of London.

In addition, students and their dependants who are allowed to work will now be able to work as postgraduate doctors or dentists in training.

Lastly, parents of Child students will be granted leave to expire at the same time as the Child Student, or on the Child Student’s 12th birthday, whichever is sooner. This is a positive change as, with the current rules, a parent had to re-apply every twelve months instead.

Skilled workers – UK Visas

The main changes include:

  • The minimum skill threshold is lowered from RQF level 6 to RQF level 3.
  • The general salary threshold is lowered from £30,000 to £25,600; with this salary being “exchangeable” when other requirements are met, including having a PhD qualification relevant to the job; a PhD qualification in a STEM subject relevant to the job; a job in a shortage occupation; being a new entrant (with this definition being amended to allow those sponsored in postdoctoral research position; those working towards professional qualifications; and those who were on the Student route up to 2 years before the application); or being in a job in a listed health or education occupation.
  • The current Tier 2 cap is suspended
  • Sponsors will no longer need to undertake a Resident Labour Market Test
  • The 12-month “cooling off period” and six-year maximum length of stay in the route are being removed.
  • The £35,800 salary threshold for indefinite leave to remain applications is being removed, and replaced with £25,600 or the going rate for the occupation

Interestingly, the Home Office decided not to take into account the MAC’s recommended changes to the Shortage Occupation List yet. The justification is that

The Government does not consider changes should be made at this time, before assessing how the UK labour market develops post-Covid 19 and in response to the introduction of the new Points-Based Immigration System.

Intra-Company Transfers – UK Visas

  • For this route too, the cooling-off period is removed. There will still be a time-limit on how long an applicant can be under this route, but it will be up to 5 years in any 6-year rolling period or, for high earners, up to 9 years in any 10-year rolling period.
  • High earners will be those earning an annual salary above £73,900 (instead of £120,000). Those workers can have leave as Intra-Company workers for up to 9 years; and do not need to have been working for the business overseas for 12 months.
  • There are more flexible “switching” provisions, although applicants still need have been working for the sponsor for 12 months at the date of application (except for high earners)

EU, Swiss and Turkish nationals

Aside from the fact that EEA and Turkish nationals arriving after 31 December 2020 will need to meet the “normal” Immigration Rules, the following changes are made:

  • Appendix ECAA Extension of Stay is introduced to replicate the existing ECAA arrangements so that Turkish workers, business persons and family members currently covered by those arrangements can continue to apply. However, suitability requirements are amended so that conduct committed before
    the end of the transition period is considered under the previous arrangements for restricting rights, whereas conduct committed after that date will be considered under the UK criminality thresholds.
  • Appendix Service Provides from Switzerland is introduced, creating a brand new immigration route for individuals employed by Swiss companies and Swiss self-employed individuals to come to the UK for up to 90 days/year to fulfil contracts in the UK. To be eligible, the contracts must have been signed and commenced before the end of the transition period. The route is expected to run for
    five years, until 31 December 2025.
  • Appendix S2 Healthcare Visitor is introduced to allow eligible patients, and those accompanying them to provide them with care or support, to come to the UK free of charge to receive a course of planned healthcare treatment provided by the NHS under the “S2 route”.
  • Appendix FM is amended to allow “new” family members of EU nationals with limited leave under Appendix EU; and of Turkish worker or business persons with limited leave to apply under those Rules. In other words, family relations which started before 31 December 2020 fall under Appendix EUSS and Appendix ECAA, while relations starting after that will fall under Appendix FM
  • The rules will provide for those who have not applied under the EUSS before 30 June 2021 to apply after that date if there are “reasonable grounds why they missed the deadline”. This is the rule that was mediatised last week. There is no definition of “reasonable grounds” so presumably the Home Office will issue guidance about it in due course.
  • The generous “assumed dependency” of a parent or grandparent of an EU national will be discontinued from 1 July 2021, at which point it will still be possible to apply, but dependency will no longer be assumed and will instead need to be evidenced.

Youth Mobility Scheme

San Marino is being added to the Youth Mobility scheme country list as a country without Deemed Sponsorship Status with an allocation of 1,000 places. The Republic of Korea is being added to the list of countries where invitation to apply arrangements apply.

Global Talent

Changes are made to

  • the criteria for consideration of senior appointments
  • the definition of the types of academic and research roles that qualify, which is being expanded.

Hong Kong British Nationals (Overseas) – UK Visas 

Regarding this route – it will be the last one to come into force on 31 January 2021.

The Visa Scheme for Hong Kong British National (Overseas) citizens, details of which had been published in a policy statement are now in the Rules.

There are two routes:

  1. The BN(O) Status Holder route, for BN(O) citizens ordinarily resident in Hong Kong or the UK and their dependent family members
  2. The BN(O) Household Member route, for adult children, born on or after 1 July 1997, of BN(O) citizens; and their dependent family members, provided they form part of the same household as the BN(O) citizen.

CONSULTATION FROM LONDON IMMIGRATION LAWYERS  – UK VISAS

You can request consultation from our immigration lawyers over the phone as in person.

Mann’s Solutions is international immigration law firm with offices in London, Hong Kong and Moscow and has expertise in offering UK Visas and Immigration by Investment services to high net worth individuals. Our immigration lawyers regulated by OISC (Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner).

For further information or to discuss your personal circumstances in a private consultation with our immigration lawyers in London Office, please contact us at enquiries@manns-solutions.com or call +44 207 993 63 46.

Tier 2 Sponsor License: Management and Appointing an Authorising Officer

Once a Tier 2 sponsor license application is approved, and the sponsor licence is issued, the employer is given access to the online UK Visa and Immigration system called the sponsorship management system (SMS).

As a sponsor, the employer has specific duties such as record keeping, reporting, monitoring and co-operating with the Home Office. SMS allows the employer to manage day-to-day sponsorship duties, responsibilities and activities relating to the Tier 2 General sponsorship.

The system can be used to:

  • Request new certificates of sponsorship.
  • Report changes in the circumstances of sponsored employees.
  • Report changes in the circumstances of the sponsor.
  • Renew certificates of sponsorship.
  • Report a migrant who fails to show up for work on the first day.
  • Report absence from work for a certain time.
  • Report if the migrant is promoted, or;
  • the core duties change, or;
  • there is a change in salary, and so on.

Managing the sponsorship licence is an important responsibility, and the employer needs to appoint someone within the business to fulfil sponsorship management roles.

Authorising officer – Tier 2 Sponsor Licence

One of the management roles that needs to be fulfilled is the role of the authorising officer.

The authorising officer has overall responsibility for managing the sponsorship licence and ensure that the sponsor is not in breach of any sponsor duties.

The person appointed to the role must be the most senior person responsible for the recruitment of migrant workers. If you do not recruit the workers you sponsor, the authorising officer must be the most senior person responsible for your activity as a licensed sponsor. It should be a person that understands the importance of this role and that the sponsor can trust with the responsibility.

The authorising officer must be:

  • An employee of the sponsor and cannot be an external party.
  • Based in the UK for the duration of the term as authorising officer.

The authorising officer must be a suitable person and must not:

  • Have an unspent criminal conviction.
  • Be subject to bankruptcy restrictions.
  • Have previous immigration violations.
  • Have past non-compliance issues with sponsor or immigration rules.

Sponsors also need a key contact and a level 1 user on the SMS. Having a level 2 user is optional. Despite being responsible for the actions of all SMS users, the authorising officer does not have automatic access to the SMS. To access the system, the authorising officer must be set up as a level 1 or level 2 user.  Often this means, one person has two roles.

The authorising officer is responsible for ensuring that the key contact and other level 1 and 2 users are competent to manage the sponsored employees and use the sponsorship management system. It is therefore essential that the authorising officer reviews the activities on the SMS regularly, and approves any requests for changes on the SMS.

Authorising officers must be available to meet with immigration officers on visits and must be familiar with the HR processes and systems of the sponsor. They are usually the first point of contact for UK Visa and Immigration.

The sponsor must have an authorising officer in place for the duration of the Sponsorship licence. If the authorising officer leaves the organisation, the SMS must be updated as soon as possible and no later than within 10 working days.

The sponsor is ultimately responsible for the actions of the authorising officer.

CONSULTATION FROM LONDON IMMIGRATION LAWYERS 

You can request consultation from our immigration lawyers over the phone as in person.

Mann’s Solutions is international immigration law firm with offices in London, Hong Kong and Moscow and has expertise in offering UK Visas and Immigration by Investment services to high net worth individuals. Our immigration lawyers regulated by OISC (Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner).

For further information or to discuss your personal circumstances in a private consultation with our immigration lawyers in London Office, please contact us at enquiries@manns-solutions.com or call +44 207 993 63 46.

Tier 2 General Visa: Changing employers

If a Tier 2 General visa holder wants to change to a new job with a different employer whilst on the Tier 2 General visa, a change of employment application must be made. The visa holder needs to apply for a new Tier 2 visa.

Many workers assume that they can transfer their Tier 2 visa to a new employer. However, this is not the case; the applicant must apply for a new Tier 2 visa.

 

Requirements for change of employment

To successfully apply for a change of employment, the applicant must:

  • Have a new job offer.
  • Apply for a new certificate of sponsorship (COS) from the new sponsor.
  • Meet all the other point requirements for a new Tier 2 General visa.

The new employer must be a UK licensed sponsor and meet all the requirements for the category that the applicant is applying for. If the new employer does not have a sponsor licence, they will need to apply for one.

The new employer may be required to do a new resident labour market test unless the job is on the shortage occupation list or the applicant will earn more than £159,600. The applicant may not replace a suitable settled worker.

The applicant must receive a new biometric residence permit (BRP). A BRP serves as proof of the applicant’s immigration status, plus right to stay and work in the UK.

 

Documents required for new Tier 2 General application

To apply for a new Tier 2 visa, the applicant must provide the following documents:

A new certificate of sponsorship from the new employer with a sponsor licence reference number.

The new certificate must confirm:

  • The commencement date of the new COS.
  • The applicant’s personal information and contact details.
  • The sponsor’s full details.
  • The job title, the salary (at least the appropriate rate for the job) and the employment start date.
  • A current passport or travel document with at least one blank page for the visa.

 

When applying for a Tier 2 visa, applicants must provide:

  • Proof of finances such as an original bank or building society statement.
  • Proof of English language knowledge.
  • Tuberculosis test results.
  • Criminal record certificates.

Applicants applying for change of employment and a new Tier 2 visa are legally required to submit all the above-mentioned evidence for the new application. However, if the applicant is already in possession of a Tier 2 visa, it might not be necessary to re-submit all the supporting evidence if these were provided with the previous Tier 2 application. This will depend on each application, and it is always good practice to have the evidence and supporting documents available.

  • If the applicant’s circumstances have changed, for example, a change in marital status or the birth of a child, marriage/divorce/civil partnership or birth certificates must be provided.

Starting the new job

The applicant may only start at the new job after the application is approved.

The applicant may continue to work for the previous sponsor until the start date on the new certificate of sponsorship if the applicant’s current permission to stay is still valid.

Applicants should not start the new job until they receive their new biometric residence card with the new permission.

CONSULTATION FROM LONDON IMMIGRATION LAWYERS 

You can request consultation from our immigration lawyers over the phone as in person.

Mann’s Solutions is international immigration law firm with offices in London, Hong Kong and Moscow and has expertise in offering UK Visas and Immigration by Investment services to high net worth individuals. Our immigration lawyers regulated by OISC (Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner).

For further information or to discuss your personal circumstances in a private consultation with our immigration lawyers in London Office, please contact us at enquiries@manns-solutions.com or call +44 207 993 63 46.

Tier 2 Sponsorship Licence: Preparing for a Home Office audit

The Home Office will visit Tier 2 sponsorship licence holders to verify the information given in the sponsorship licence application. Visits will be made to the sponsor’s business premises, with or without prior notice. Sponsors should be well prepared at all times for these compliance audits.

A visit can take place whilst the application is pending or thereafter. Audit visits are required to verify the sponsor’s ability to comply with requirements and responsibilities on an ongoing basis.

During these audit visits, the sponsor must be ready and prepared to produce requested documentation and other evidence to show compliance with Immigration rules.

The officer will evaluate record keeping, monitoring systems and general compliance with sponsor duties.  More specifically, they will check:

  • That the information given is accurate and complete.
  • The sponsor is genuine and trading and operating lawfully in the UK.
  • The sponsor can offer employment, and the vacancy is genuine.
  • There is no reason to believe the sponsor is a threat to immigration control.
  • The sponsor understands and is complying to all the duties of sponsorship.
  • That the company has systems in place to ensure compliance.

What happens during the audit visit?

  • The officer may inspect the premises and verify information given during the application.
  • Check that you are complying with sponsor duties such as monitoring and record keeping.
  • Speak to sponsored workers, including previously sponsored workers.
  • Interview people involved in the recruitment of workers.
  • Inspect records and HR systems to ensure compliance.
  • Make sure that the sponsor is not employing illegal workers.
  • Review sponsored workers’ files.

The Home Officer will usually interview the authorising officer and other key personnel. The officer will investigate how the employer conducted the resident labour market test and how right to work obligations and checks are implemented.

What can the sponsor do to be prepared?

 Sponsors should be up to date with their duties and responsibilities and ensure that HR systems are in place to comply with sponsor duties.

If the sponsor receives prior notification of an audit visit, the sponsor may request a postponement to a more convenient time. A postponement might be a good idea to ensure that your house is in order. However, the visit may be unannounced, so the sponsor should always be prepared for an audit visit.

To be prepared for an unannounced visit, sponsors should:

  • Review all files regularly.
  • Keep filing up to date and check that all information is up to date; any changes must be reported.
  • Review all right to work documentation – make sure that copies of all passports and visa documentation are on file.
  • Make sure records and files are organised and easily accessible.
  • Use checklists.
  • Prepare key personnel.

Check that the authorising officer understands the sponsor licence and the duties. They must be prepared to answer questions about whether the worker is suitably skilled, whether the recruitment process complied with Home Office rules and whether the workers are paid according to the visa. The authorising officer must have a general understanding of employment law and understand legal compliance and ensure that they are up to date with immigration rules.

It is a good idea to carry out mock-audits and make notes of areas where systems can be improved. Implement improvements.

If you do not have the HR personnel or systems in place to manage your sponsorship licence, you should instead employ immigration consultants to manage your sponsor licence.

The outcome of an audit visit can have significant consequences for the business. It is critical to be prepared and ready.

CONSULTATION FROM LONDON IMMIGRATION LAWYERS  – Tier 2 Sponsorship Licence

You can request consultation from our immigration lawyers over the phone as in person.

Mann’s Solutions is international immigration law firm with offices in London, Hong Kong and Moscow and has expertise in offering UK Visas and Immigration by Investment services to high net worth individuals. Our immigration lawyers regulated by OISC (Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner).

For further information or to discuss your personal circumstances in a private consultation with our immigration lawyers in London Office, please contact us at enquiries@manns-solutions.com or call +44 207 993 63 46.

Innovator visa: Frequently Asked Questions

The UK Innovator visa is for established international entrepreneurs who would like to establish a business in the UK.  The proposed business must be an innovative, viable and scalable business idea which has been approved by an endorsing organisation. Those who hold an innovator visa are not permitted to work for an employer but engage in business activities in the UK.  They can also be accompanied by their dependants which includes children.

Q1. What is definition of Business as innovative, viable and scalable? 

Whilst each endorsing body will have their own slightly different criteria, the Immigration Rules do provide a general definition of each word. Innovation looks at whether the business idea is genuine and original, meeting current or future market needs. Viability is concerned with the skills and knowledge of the applicant and scalability addresses whether there is any evidence of structured and logical planning including consideration for job creation and business growth.

Q2: Will Applicant get a British Passport if they have an Innovator visa?

Yes. Once applicant obtained the Innovator visa entry clearance and stays for 3 years on it, then they can apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK. Two years after obtaining settlement, they can apply to become British citizen.

Q3: Once Applicant get endorsed by an endorsing body, what is the next step with them?

The endorsing bodies are their mentor, guiding applicant through the process of becoming an established entrepreneur in the UK. The Home Office request that they regularly check on applicant’s progress in the form of meetings 6 months and then 12 months after their visa has been approved.

Q4: The endorsing body is charging applicant for an endorsement, is this allowed? 

In general Endorsement bodies are able to charge applicant for any services that they also provide to non-start-up applicants, such as office space or mentoring. This can include membership to the programme that may lead to an endorsement.

Q5: Applicant has obtained an endorsement; will their immigration application definitely be approved?

The endorsement of the applicant is effectively the start of the uk visa preparation process. The Home Office will consider applicant’s endorsement letter, but they will also look at other factors such as:

  • Is the evidence submitted genuine and credible;
  • previous educational, work and immigration history; and other

Q7: Can applicant bring their family to the UK?

Yes. Applicant can bring their family members, such as spouse or unmarried partner and dependent children under the age of 18. Their family members will be issued a visa for the same duration as applicant’s visa.

CONSULTATION FROM LONDON IMMIGRATION LAWYERS 

You can request consultation from our immigration lawyers over the phone as in person.

Mann’s Solutions is international immigration law firm with offices in London, Hong Kong and Moscow and has expertise in offering UK Visas and Immigration by Investment services to high net worth individuals. Our immigration lawyers regulated by OISC (Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner).

For further information or to discuss your personal circumstances in a private consultation with our immigration lawyers in London Office, please contact us at enquiries@manns-solutions.com or call +44 207 993 63 46.

Dominica Citizenship by Investment: Eligibility requirements and Qualifying investments

The Commonwealth of Dominica Citizenship by Investment program is one of the oldest and most affordable citizen programs in the world. It offers investors and their eligible family members legal citizenship in return for an investment in Dominica. It is a quick route to a second passport and visa-free travel to over 137 countries, including the EU and UK.

Citizenship is valid for life, and no physical residency is required.

Passports can be granted in 2-3 months from making a qualifying investment.

Eligibility requirements

  • Applicants must be at least 18 years old, of good character, and without a criminal record.
  • The applicant’s spouse, children under 30 years, parents, and siblings may be included.
  • The applicant must be willing to make the required financial contribution or investment.

Other than the contribution or investment, applicants must pay fees relating to due diligence and the application process.

Qualifying investments

There are 2 types of investments that qualify for citizenship.

  • Donations to the government fund.

Applicants can make a donation (economic contribution) of $100,000 to the economic diversification fund. The fund was established through the citizenship by investment program and supports public and private socio-economic development initiatives in education, healthcare, sport, and tourism. Contributions are non-refundable.

The amount of the donation varies depending on how many dependents are included in the application.

  • Single applicant – $100,000.
  • Spouse of the main applicant – $50,000.
  • Sibling of the main applicant or the spouse of the main applicant (between 18-25 years old) – $50,000.
  • Dependents of the main applicant – $25,000 each.
  • A family of four – $175,000.

The amount is specified in United States dollars (USD), but the government accepts euros (EUR) and pounds sterling (GBP).

  • Real estate Investment

Applicants can invest in designated real estate with a value of at least $200,000.

The investment must be in authorised property, approved by the government under the citizenship by investment program, and kept for at least 3 years from the date citizenship is granted.

Application fees for a real estate investment apply and currently varies between $25,000 for a single applicant to $70,000 for a family of up to 6 persons.

The process

Before investing, applicants need to apply to the Dominica Citizenship by Investment Unit via an authorised agent. If the initial application is successful, applicants will receive an “approval in principle.”

Once the approval in principle is received, the applicant must complete the donation or the real estate investment. Upon receiving proof of payment, the unit will issue a certificate of registration which serves as evidence of citizenship. The applicant may then apply for a Dominica passport.

There are many advantages of having a second passport and dual citizenship. Once citizenship is received, the applicant has the same rights to live, work, and study in Dominica like any other citizen. Besides full residency status that includes working rights, Dominica offers an attractive tax regime with no tax on foreign income, wealth or inheritance, or capital gains tax. It also offers a number of incentives for entrepreneurs.

CONSULTATION FROM LONDON IMMIGRATION LAWYERS – Dominica Citizenship by Investment

You can request consultation from our immigration lawyers over the phone as in person.

Mann’s Solutions is international immigration law firm with offices in London, Hong Kong and Moscow and has expertise in offering UK Visas and Immigration by Investment services to high net worth individuals. Our immigration lawyers regulated by OISC (Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner).

For further information or to discuss your personal circumstances in a private consultation with our immigration lawyers in London Office, please contact us at enquiries@manns-solutions.com or call +44 207 993 63 46.